Monday, April 7, 2014

E is for Emmet Street





Emmet Street and St. Mary's Parish Church 
are located at the top of Mary Street, Dungarvan.

St. Mary's Parish Church.
Photo by Libby Cotter Flynn

Emmet Street is named after the poet and orator, Robert Emmet. Born on March 4, 1778. He was a member of the United Irishmen, and an Irish nationalist. Emmet led the unsuccessful 1803 rebellion against British rule.

View of Emmet Street from the corner of Mary Street.
Photo by Libby Cotter Flynn
He was captured and tried for high treason on September 19, 1803.
Emmet concluded his speech from the dock with these words:

"Let no man write my epitaph; for as no man who knows my motives dares now vindicate them, let not prejudice nor ignorance asperse them. Let them rest in obscurity and peace: my memory be left in oblivion, and my tomb remain uninscribed, until other times and other men can do justice to my character. When my country takes her place among the nations of the earth, then, and not till then, let my epitaph be written'


Photo by Libby Cotter Flynn

 On September 20, 1803 Robert Emmet climbed the scaffold steps with a steady resolve. He addressed the crowd in a loud firm voice:

''My Friends, I die in peace and with sentiments of universal love and kindness towards all men''

Emmet Street from the corner of Friary Street.
Photo by Libby Cotter Flynn

A rope was placed around his neck. The plank under him was tilted. He hung for a few minutes and then was beheaded. Robert Emmet was 24 years old. 

View of Emmet Street from outside St. Mary's Catholic Church.
Photo by Libby Cotter Flyn
You would be hard pressed not to find an Emmet Street wherever you go in Ireland today.






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